Et nytt materiale som fungerer som en kontrollerbar termisk masse

Forside Forum Earthship løsninger for Norge Oppvarming Et nytt materiale som fungerer som en kontrollerbar termisk masse

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  • #9852

    Dag Ove
    Nøkkelmester

    Forskere på MIT har utviklet et materiale som kan ta til seg solvarme og frigi den igjen «on demand». Blir vel som en slags termisk masse, men med mer kontroll over når og hvor energien frigies igjen? Kan bli spennende å se om dette blir et rimelig materiale som kan være aktuelt i earthship og lignende boliger.

    MIT materiale

    http://perfscience.com/content/2143029-mit-researchers-create-material-can-soak-solar-heat-and-release-it-demand

    Tekst fra artikkelen:
    MIT researchers create material that can soak up solar heat and release it on demand
    Submitted by Luis Georg on Sun, 01/10/2016 – 06:45

    MIT researchers create material that can soak up solar heat & release it on demand
    A team of researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) claimed to have developed a new material that can soak up & store solar heat and release it later on demand.

    The researchers led by MIT Prof. Jeffrey Grossman claimed that a new type of polymer film created by them can first soak up heat energy from the Sun during the day and then release it when needed.

    The researchers explained that they created the new solar thermal fuels using chemical compounds known as azobenzenes that are capable of changing on the molecular level in response to the Sun’s heat. A stimulus like a small temperature burst can later cause them to slip back to their original molecular layout, leading to discharge of the stored heat.

    The new material could prove very beneficial as heat from the Sun is available only during the day, and in many places, days are shorter than normal.

    Prof. Ted Sargent, the vice-dean for research at the University of Toronto, said, “The approach is innovative and distinctive. The research is a major advance towards the practical application of solid-state energy-storage/heat-release materials from both a scientific and engineering point of view.”

    The MIT researchers continue to work on the film to improve the new material’s capacity, believing that its release in the future could signal a major step for heating operations.

    #9898

    Dag Ove
    Nøkkelmester

    Litt mer om materialet, i en artikkel fra engadget:
    http://www.engadget.com/2016/01/11/material-stores-solar-heat-for-later/

    MIT materiale fra engadget

    Tekst i artikkelen:

    New material can store solar energy to warm you up later
    A solid film releases a burst of heat just when you need it.

    Solar projects are usually focused on generating electricity, but we could arguably save more power by storing heat. Scientists from MIT have created a new type of solid material that does exactly that. When exposed to sunlight, it assumes a «charged» state that can be maintained for long periods of time. However, when triggered with a small burst of heat, the material reverts to its original chemical composition, releasing a much larger amount of heat energy. Since the film is thin and transparent, scientists think it could be useful in the near future for defrosting your car’s windshield and could one day heat your home or even your clothes.

    The film can be made using a two-step process that’s «very simple and very scalable,» according to grad student Eugene Cho. The scientists start with materials called azobenzenes that change their chemistry when exposed to sunlight. They then modify them so that they can change states with a burst of heat, which in turn releases much more energy. The current prototype can increase the ambient temperature by 10 degrees Celsius (about 18 degrees Fahrenheit), which is enough to break ice off of a windshield, for instance. Since the material is transparent, it could be used on the front windshields of cars, saving a lot of energy over the normal defrosting process.

    The team needs to change the tint of the film so that it’s less yellow, and is also aiming to double the heat yield to a 20 degree Celcius boost (36 degrees Fahrenheit). However, the existing material is already good enough for defrosting and other heating applications, and could be manufactured relatively easy as-is. «The research is a major advance towards the practical application of solid-state energy-storage/heat-release materials from both a scientific and engineering point of view,» says Ted Sargent, a University of Toronto professor not involved in the research.

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